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Streets of Philadelphia

A ridesharing street photographer documents life in the city

Philly Yo!

Great day in the greatest of cities – my home and heart reside in Philadelphia.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Spring Has Sprung

Temperatures in the high 60’s means lots of people out and about..  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Nice to be Back

Ahhh…  Managed to stay in the city confines for most of the day today.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

 

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens.  They were then processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Skimpy Day

I got yanked out of the city very early this morning and didn’t have much time after getting back, so these two images will have to do for today…

 

Barren

“Barren” – Neighborhood: Cobbs Creek

 

Botulism Waiting to Happen

“Botulism Waiting to Happen” – Neighborhood: University City

Both of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens.  They were then processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Infamous Address – 6221 Osage Avenue

The location of the MOVE siege and subsequent bombing that burned down two city blocks of row homes.

MOVE House

“MOVE House” – Neighborhood: Cobbs Creek

MOVE is a Philadelphia-based black liberation group founded by John Africa (born Vincent Leaphart) in 1972.  The group is particularly known for two major conflicts with the Philadelphia Police Department.

Living communally in a house in West Philadelphia (Powelton Village initially), members of MOVE all changed their surnames to Africa, shunned modern technology and materialism, and preached support of animal rights, revolution and a return to nature.

Their first conflict with law enforcement occurred in 1978, when police tried to evict them from their house. A firefight erupted, killing one police officer and injuring several more on both sides.  After surrendering, Delbert Africa was subjected to one of the most horrific examples of police brutality ever witnessed.

Encouraged by the eminently racist Mayor of the City (Frank Rizzo), the police and investigators lied their asses off to justify their actions.

Nine members of the group were sentenced to 100 years in prison for the officer’s killing – even though evidence clearly pointed to “friendly fire” for this unfortunate action. In 1981, the group moved to a row house on Osage Avenue.

At their new home, MOVE members boarded up the windows and armed themselves in an attempt to protect their family from further police action.  Members continued to rack up violations from contempt of court to illegal possession of firearms, to the point where they were considered a terrorist organization by the mayor and police commissioner.

On the morning of May 13, 1985, the police moved on the house.

Arriving with arrest warrants for four residents of the house, the police ordered them to come out peacefully. Before long, shooting began – who started shooting first is a point of contention.

In response, more than 500 police officers discharged over 10,000 rounds of ammunition in 90 minutes. The house was hit with high-pressure firehoses and tear gas, but MOVE did not surrender.

Despite pleas for deescalation to the mayor from City Council President Joseph Coleman and State Senator Hardy Williams, Police Commissioner Gregore Sambor gave the order to bomb the house.

At 5:28 p.m., a satchel bomb composed of FBI-supplied C4 and Tovex TR2, a dynamite substitute, on a 45-second timer was dropped from a state police helicopter, detonating on the roof of the house.

Within minutes, a fire had consumed the roof and begun to spread.

Firefighters, already fearful of being shot at, were told to let the fire burn.

The blaze raged out of control, spreading down the block of row houses and hopping the narrow streets.

By the time it was extinguished four hours later, 61 houses had been razed. Apart from a woman and 13-year-old boy who escaped when the fire started, everyone in the MOVE house was dead.

The 11 deaths included MOVE founder John Africa, five adults and five children between the ages of seven and 13.

Despite investigations and formal apologies, neither the mayor, nor the police commissioner, nor anyone else from the city was criminally charged.

The image above shows this address as it appears now.  It was rebuilt (along with two whole adjoining blocks) in the years that followed the incident.  Oddly enough, all of these new structures were built very poorly by city-awarded contractors, and were all formally condemned afterwards.

The featured image in this post (historic street scene taken at the height of the uprising in 1985) is credited to Peter Morgan of the Associated Press.

Want to know more?  Have a look at this excellent film…

 

Nice Day on the Streets

Beautiful, albeit short, day today for shooting.  Spring may finally be upon us.

Here are the highlights…

Hover over any image in the mosaic above to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F, and processes with Iridient X-Transformer & Adobe Lightroom Classic.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

We have a couple of “bonus” images for today, taken in two distinctly different neighborhoods.

Ogontz…

PeelingPart of my series &quot;Streets of Philadelphia&quot;.View the rest, here... <a href="//streetsofphilly.blog/&quot;">StreetOfPhilly.Blog</a>

“Peeling” – Long neglected storefront on 10th Street.

Ogontz gets its name from Ogontz Avenue, a thoroughfare which runs diagonally through the uniform grid of streets in the city.  Many of the commercial and residential properties on Ogontz Ave. began to decline in the early 1970s.

This North Philadelphia neighborhood has been marginalized throughout the years with many of the businesses closing and residents leaving.  Ogontz is often considered part of West Oak Lane, which is a much larger neighborhood and lot of what happens there carries over.

Ogontz is a predominantly middle-class African American community.  While some of the houses are the typical row homes found throughout Philadelphia, Ogontz has some architecture that is distinct to its neighborhood.  Many of the houses are detached on tree lined streets with small yards.  This set-up gives it a very suburban feel and makes it appealing to families with children.

The neighborhood used to have several historic sites such as the tavern, Cedar Park Inn and The Ogontz theatre.  Both of these locations were eventually closed down and demolished.

East Oak Lane…

Once GrandPart of my series &quot;Streets of Philadelphia&quot;.View the rest, here... <a href="//streetsofphilly.blog/&quot;">StreetOfPhilly.Blog</a>

“Once Grand” – Typical of many of the large but now decaying estate type homes in the area.

This area of Philadelphia was first settled in 1683 as one of  William Penn’s first neighborhoods.  In 1695, a Welshman named Griffith Miles bought 250 acres of land here and built a log home along a dirt road that would later be known as Oak Lane.  The area became known as Milestown in 1711, and as farming began to flourish, water-powered mills were built.

The road that came to define the neighborhood, initially called Martin’s Mill Road, was renamed Oak Lane by a landowner in 1860, in remembrance of an ancient oak tree that had blown down in a storm.

Once exclusive to the wealthy, who built a great many estate homes on it’s tree-lined streets, it is now an area where people of decidedly more modest means call home.

Both of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Only in Olney

Olney is an interesting neighborhood in Philadelphia. It is roughly bounded by Roosevelt Boulevard to the south, Tacony Creek to the east, Godfrey Avenue to the north, and the railroad right-of-way west of Seventh Street to the west.

Although Olney is primarily a quiet residential neighborhood, portions do serve as major commercial centers for many surrounding groups. 5th Street has a Korean-American business district in the vicinity of Olney Avenue, and Hispanic businesses flourish in the southern reaches of the neighborhood.

Beauty

“Beauty”

One of the many businesses that flourish along 5th Street.

Tired

“Tired”

I had been trying to get this shot for days, but the traffic behind me never would cooperate – until today.

De-Fence!

“De-Fence!”

Here is some more info on this particular area – courtesy of Wikipedia:

Up until the late nineteenth century, Olney was a vast, hilly farmland in the hinterland of Philadelphia County. Until then, the population consisted mainly of farmers and wealthy Philadelphians who could afford to live away from the city.

As the city of Philadelphia grew northwards, the area became more urbanized. People seeking to escape the growing population density towards the center moved to Olney. Soon thereafter, businesses began appearing, largely centered at 5th Street and Olney Avenue. Industry was also attracted and companies such as Heintz Manufacturing Company, Proctor and Schwartz, and Brown Instrument Division built factories in the neighborhood. But this took second place to the strong commercial district, led by the Olney Businessmans’ Association.

The population grew even more after the construction of the Broad Street Subway which had its original terminal at Olney Avenue (Olney Transportation Center). It promised to get riders from Olney to City Hall in less than twenty minutes for fifteen cents. In addition to trolley lines that traveled east and west, this made Olney Philadelphia’s northern transportation hub and gave Olneyites easy access to the entire city and beyond.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Here, There and a Bit of Everywhere

Covered a decent amount of ground today.  Managed to visit more than a few neighborhoods in this fair city.

Here are the highlights…

Hover over any image in the mosaic above to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Strawberry / Nicetown Dreams

Very short day for me.  Only 2 images to post – a definite deficit – both in terms of “quantity” and “quality” this time around.

Oh well, there is always tomorrow…

Gritty

“Gritty” – Neighborhood: Strawberry Mansion

Still Available

“Still Available” – Neighborhood: Tioga / Nicetown

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

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