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Streets of Philadelphia

A ridesharing street photographer documents life in the city

Rain, Rain – Go Away

Got time in before the rain today to catch a few…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F or Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF90mm F/2 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Storm Coming

Been a few days since I could get in front of the “puter”.  Here’s a bunch from all over…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

May Flowers

Weekend is coming, time to get ready.  Here’s a few pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

Allegheny West

Allegheny West is a neighborhood located in North Philadelphia. It is named after an association formed by Pep Boys and Tasty Baking Company, among others.  Its location is in the vicinity of Allegheny Avenue on the western side of Broad Street.

Hidden

“Hidden”

Like many neighborhoods in North Philadelphia, Allegheny West is primarily a poor African-American enclave that has suffered post-industrial decline and disinvestment. It faced one of the largest population losses of any neighborhood in Philadelphia between the 1990 and 2000 census. Vacant industrial sites, such as those once used to build commuter rail trains by The Budd Company, have in recent years been used in film productions.

Barren

“Barren”

An older neighborhood name formerly in use within the Allegheny West area was Swampoodle. The name is now archaic, although SEPTA’s proposed Swampoodle Connection was named for it as recently as the 1980s.  Swampoodle was defined as “the junction of three railroad lines, Lehigh Avenue and 22nd Streets.”

Cause 7 Aint Enough

“Cause 7 Aint Enough”

Party On

“Party On”

Fo' Sale

“Fo’ Sale”

Fairhill

Fairhill is a neighborhood on the east side of the North Philadelphia section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Fairhill is bordered by Front Street to the east, Germantown Avenue (10th Street) to the west, Allegheny Avenue to the north, and Cumberland Street to the south.

Discount

“Discount”

The neighborhood serves as the center of the Hispanic community of Philadelphia, and is known for its “El Centro de Oro” commercial strip along North 5th Street. The neighborhood is also the center of the Philadelphia Badlands.

Wave Goodbye

“Wave Goodbye”

Fairhill is adjacent to Harrowgate and West Kensington to the east, Hartranft to the south, Glenwood to the west, and Hunting Park to the north.

Bike Tree

“Bike Tree”

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Former Glory – Elkins Estate

And now for something completely different…

The Elkins Estate is located in Elkins Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The estate contains seven buildings, the most notable being Elstowe Manor and Chelten House, mansions designed by Horace Trumbauer.

Elstowe Manor was built in 1898 at the location where “Needles”, the former family summer home of William L. Elkins, had stood. Elkins, a Philadelphia businessman, was integral in the formation of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, the forerunner of SEPTA.

Elkins

“Elstowe Manor”

This 45-room manor House was built in the style of Italian High Renaissance. The unique interior features, such as the ornate carved wood and gilded molding, marble columns and accents, frescoed ceilings, gargoyles and the like, were crafted in Europe and shipped to the United States, where they were assembled on site. The interior was designed by renowned French interior decor experts Allard et Fils, which accounts for the distinctly French feel in some of the rooms. The home is anchored on either side by a large library and drawing room. Between these are two wings, one containing a breakfast room and dining room and the other a billiard room and den, with a separate wing leading to a large gallery. These wings all lead to a grand staircase in the center of the house. The second floor has nine bedrooms, three dressing rooms, and seven baths. The third floor and raised basement are servant quarters. With the mansion, Trumbauer also designed the wrought-iron gates at the entrance to the estate along with a small gatehouse, a powerhouse, and an eight-car garage.

Gated

“Gated”

In 1932, William H. Elkins, grandson of William L. Elkins, sold the Elstowe manor property to the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine de’ Ricci. Chelten House was owned by Philadelphia cigarette manufacturer Stephen X. Stephano. After the death of his wife, Penelope, he sold Chelten House to the Dominican Sisters in 1948.

The Dominican Sisters operated both buildings (known as the Dominican Retreat House) as a women’s religious retreat and preserved the grounds and historical integrity of the buildings. Thousands of women and men attended retreats, days of prayer, and other spiritual programs for 75 years. Women would come to pray, meditate and find a place of refuge and reflection. At its peak, as many as 14,000 women and men came to the Dominican Retreat House in one year. The dedication of the sisters to preservation of the historic mansions on the estate was extraordinary and today, in 2013, the original features and architectural details remain intact. It was described as the most significant example of Gilded Age architecture in the region by John Gallery of the Philadelphia Preservation Alliance.

Keep Out

“Keep Out”

Over time, the needs of people coming on retreat changed, and the economic challenges of operating the buildings became unsustainable for the Dominican Sisters. The Dominican Retreat House was at the time of its closing in 2006 the oldest retreat house for women in the United States.

In February 2009, the Dominican Sisters sold the 42-acre property to the Land Conservancy of Elkins Park, PA, who intended to use the facility for group spiritual, health and wellness education retreats, and also as a venue for elegant special events. The property was reopened in September 2009 as Elkins Estate and has hosted a number of wedding receptions and events. But the conservancy could not keep up payments to the sisters who held the mortgage. In November 2010, because of numerous missed payments, including a $250,000 payment on the principal, the Dominican congregation foreclosed on the property, and the conservancy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The property was in bankruptcy reorganization until October 2012, when the case was dismissed.

Another Hot One

Wow, temps in the 90’s today.  Almost too hot.  Here’s a few pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

It Really Felt Like Summer

Finally, it felt like summer today.  A welcome bit of heat after the long cold winter.

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Where the Germans Lived

Germantown is an area in Northwest Philadelphia. Founded by German Quaker and Mennonite families in 1683 as an independent borough, it was absorbed into Philadelphia in 1854.

The area, which is about six miles northwest from the city center, now consists of two neighborhoods: ‘Germantown’ and ‘East Germantown’

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

April Showers

May is almost upon us.  Time to bid April bye-bye with some pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Rain, Rain Go Away

Rain means busy for a rideshare driver.  Not much time for pics, but this one was worth the trouble.

Only One Way

“Only One Way” – Neighborhood: Kensington

This image was taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

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