Olney is an interesting neighborhood in Philadelphia. It is roughly bounded by Roosevelt Boulevard to the south, Tacony Creek to the east, Godfrey Avenue to the north, and the railroad right-of-way west of Seventh Street to the west.

Although Olney is primarily a quiet residential neighborhood, portions do serve as major commercial centers for many surrounding groups. 5th Street has a Korean-American business district in the vicinity of Olney Avenue, and Hispanic businesses flourish in the southern reaches of the neighborhood.

Beauty

“Beauty”

One of the many businesses that flourish along 5th Street.

Tired

“Tired”

I had been trying to get this shot for days, but the traffic behind me never would cooperate – until today.

De-Fence!

“De-Fence!”

Here is some more info on this particular area – courtesy of Wikipedia:

Up until the late nineteenth century, Olney was a vast, hilly farmland in the hinterland of Philadelphia County. Until then, the population consisted mainly of farmers and wealthy Philadelphians who could afford to live away from the city.

As the city of Philadelphia grew northwards, the area became more urbanized. People seeking to escape the growing population density towards the center moved to Olney. Soon thereafter, businesses began appearing, largely centered at 5th Street and Olney Avenue. Industry was also attracted and companies such as Heintz Manufacturing Company, Proctor and Schwartz, and Brown Instrument Division built factories in the neighborhood. But this took second place to the strong commercial district, led by the Olney Businessmans’ Association.

The population grew even more after the construction of the Broad Street Subway which had its original terminal at Olney Avenue (Olney Transportation Center). It promised to get riders from Olney to City Hall in less than twenty minutes for fifteen cents. In addition to trolley lines that traveled east and west, this made Olney Philadelphia’s northern transportation hub and gave Olneyites easy access to the entire city and beyond.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.