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Streets of Philadelphia

A ridesharing street photographer documents life in the city

TGIF

Friday already?  It seems to be, here are todays shots…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a Fujifilm X100F.

 

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Here & There

Short day today, here are the results…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a Fujifilm X100F.

 

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Some From the Far Northeast

I’m really not a fan of the Far Northeast neighborhoods.  Not gritty enough for me, and too tame.  But here are some from a few of the neighborhoods up there.

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a Fujifilm X100F.

 

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Ho-Hum Monday

Did I mention I hate Mondays?  Especially rainy ones.  Here’s today’s “catch”…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a Fujifilm X100F and X-H1 accompanied by a Fujinon 90mm F2 lens.

 

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Analog Friday

Yes, I still shoot film on occasion, and I realize that this is being posted on a Saturday, but the post title states otherwise.  Things move more slowly in the analog world.

Decided to concentrate on four nearby neighborhoods this day – East Falls, Chestnut Hill plus East & West Mount Airy.

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a Nikon F4 with a Nikkor 35-70mm F2.8 AF-D lens.  The film used was Kodak TRI-X, shot at 400 ISO and developed in HC-110.

Chestnut Hill

 

Once a suburb where well-to-do Philadelphians escaped the city’s summer heat, Chestnut Hill saw an influx of year-round residents with the arrival of railroads in the 19th century. Since then, it remains a relatively affluent community with an array of historic mansions and Victorian twin and row houses.

East & West Mount Airy

 

 

 

Sometimes a name so perfectly fits a neighborhood that it immediately creates an accurate mental image. Gently rising from the banks of Wissahickon Creek roughly 20 minutes from Center City, Mt. Airy combines dense leafy parkland, miles of multi-use trails, tree-lined streets and a historic cobblestoned business corridor attracting aspiring entrepreneurs. Mt. Airy’s varied architecture recounts its historical roots. Structures dating back to the 18th century commingle with Victorian and 20th-century homes.

East Falls

 

East Falls (a.k.a. The Falls) is a neighborhood in the Northwest section of Philadelphia on the east or left bank side of the now submerged Schuylkill River cataracts, the ‘Falls of the Schuylkill’ that became submerged as the Schuylkill Canal and Fairmount Water Works projects were completed in 1822. The East Falls community is located adjacent to Germantown, Roxborough, Allegheny West, and Nicetown-Tioga neighborhoods.
Recently, East Falls has been undergoing redevelopment to elevate its status to nearby Manayunk and other local shopping districts in the Philadelphia area. The recently completed Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education Center offers instruction to Philadelphia youth in a 9.2-acre, sixteen-court facility that operates in cooperation with the City of Philadelphia, School District of Philadelphia, and others. It was built with private funding in partnership with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

 

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Support the Arts by Becoming a Patron

Lots of changes around here lately…

In addition to launching our new WEBSITE that hosts the entirely of this project, we have also created a presence on “Patreon”.

Doing so, will make it easier to make the “Streets of Philadelphia” project the best it can be.

Patreon lets viewers support their favorite creatives by becoming patrons, giving a small donation every month, automatically through paypal / credit card. Unlike other fundraising services (for example Kickstarter), which raise lots of money for a single big event, Patreon is for creators who publish online a stream of smaller works, like website updates, articles, researches, and need just little money every month. Empowering a new generation of creators, Patreon is bringing patronage back to the 21st century.

The new server that hosts this project costs about 300$ a year. We are an independent site. No money is generated from our work so we must pay each and every bill ourselves, with the help of a few awesome supporters.

If you want to help to fund this project and if you can donate some of your love every month, the easiest way to do so is to make a contribution through Patreon. You can just donate how much or little you want, and you can cancel your pledge at any point if you’re low on cash or have a change of heart. Every cent is really appreciated and sent towards the promoting the art of Street Photography. Patreon takes 5% and the creators cover the credit card transaction fees which are generally 4%, so we would see around $0.90 of every dollar.

Click HERE to see what this is all about.

 

Tuesday is Bluesday

Short day for me, but not for photos…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F or Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF90mm F/2 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Visit the full “Streets of Philadelphia” photo-site at this LINK.

This Project is truly a labor of love.  If you would like to make a contribution tawards its completion, please consider becoming a patron – HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Muggy Morning

Pretty busy day today, but managed to get in a few…

 

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F or Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF90mm F/2 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Creative Commons License
All work, especially imagery, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License
Click the link above for details.

Buy One, Get One…

Didn’t get a chance to post photos from yesterday, so here is making up for lost time.

Yesterday:

Today:

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F or Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF90mm F/2 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Rain, Rain – Go Away

Got time in before the rain today to catch a few…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F or Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF90mm F/2 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Storm Coming

Been a few days since I could get in front of the “puter”.  Here’s a bunch from all over…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

May Flowers

Weekend is coming, time to get ready.  Here’s a few pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

Allegheny West

Allegheny West is a neighborhood located in North Philadelphia. It is named after an association formed by Pep Boys and Tasty Baking Company, among others.  Its location is in the vicinity of Allegheny Avenue on the western side of Broad Street.

Hidden

“Hidden”

Like many neighborhoods in North Philadelphia, Allegheny West is primarily a poor African-American enclave that has suffered post-industrial decline and disinvestment. It faced one of the largest population losses of any neighborhood in Philadelphia between the 1990 and 2000 census. Vacant industrial sites, such as those once used to build commuter rail trains by The Budd Company, have in recent years been used in film productions.

Barren

“Barren”

An older neighborhood name formerly in use within the Allegheny West area was Swampoodle. The name is now archaic, although SEPTA’s proposed Swampoodle Connection was named for it as recently as the 1980s.  Swampoodle was defined as “the junction of three railroad lines, Lehigh Avenue and 22nd Streets.”

Cause 7 Aint Enough

“Cause 7 Aint Enough”

Party On

“Party On”

Fo' Sale

“Fo’ Sale”

Fairhill

Fairhill is a neighborhood on the east side of the North Philadelphia section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Fairhill is bordered by Front Street to the east, Germantown Avenue (10th Street) to the west, Allegheny Avenue to the north, and Cumberland Street to the south.

Discount

“Discount”

The neighborhood serves as the center of the Hispanic community of Philadelphia, and is known for its “El Centro de Oro” commercial strip along North 5th Street. The neighborhood is also the center of the Philadelphia Badlands.

Wave Goodbye

“Wave Goodbye”

Fairhill is adjacent to Harrowgate and West Kensington to the east, Hartranft to the south, Glenwood to the west, and Hunting Park to the north.

Bike Tree

“Bike Tree”

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Former Glory – Elkins Estate

And now for something completely different…

The Elkins Estate is located in Elkins Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The estate contains seven buildings, the most notable being Elstowe Manor and Chelten House, mansions designed by Horace Trumbauer.

Elstowe Manor was built in 1898 at the location where “Needles”, the former family summer home of William L. Elkins, had stood. Elkins, a Philadelphia businessman, was integral in the formation of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, the forerunner of SEPTA.

Elkins

“Elstowe Manor”

This 45-room manor House was built in the style of Italian High Renaissance. The unique interior features, such as the ornate carved wood and gilded molding, marble columns and accents, frescoed ceilings, gargoyles and the like, were crafted in Europe and shipped to the United States, where they were assembled on site. The interior was designed by renowned French interior decor experts Allard et Fils, which accounts for the distinctly French feel in some of the rooms. The home is anchored on either side by a large library and drawing room. Between these are two wings, one containing a breakfast room and dining room and the other a billiard room and den, with a separate wing leading to a large gallery. These wings all lead to a grand staircase in the center of the house. The second floor has nine bedrooms, three dressing rooms, and seven baths. The third floor and raised basement are servant quarters. With the mansion, Trumbauer also designed the wrought-iron gates at the entrance to the estate along with a small gatehouse, a powerhouse, and an eight-car garage.

Gated

“Gated”

In 1932, William H. Elkins, grandson of William L. Elkins, sold the Elstowe manor property to the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine de’ Ricci. Chelten House was owned by Philadelphia cigarette manufacturer Stephen X. Stephano. After the death of his wife, Penelope, he sold Chelten House to the Dominican Sisters in 1948.

The Dominican Sisters operated both buildings (known as the Dominican Retreat House) as a women’s religious retreat and preserved the grounds and historical integrity of the buildings. Thousands of women and men attended retreats, days of prayer, and other spiritual programs for 75 years. Women would come to pray, meditate and find a place of refuge and reflection. At its peak, as many as 14,000 women and men came to the Dominican Retreat House in one year. The dedication of the sisters to preservation of the historic mansions on the estate was extraordinary and today, in 2013, the original features and architectural details remain intact. It was described as the most significant example of Gilded Age architecture in the region by John Gallery of the Philadelphia Preservation Alliance.

Keep Out

“Keep Out”

Over time, the needs of people coming on retreat changed, and the economic challenges of operating the buildings became unsustainable for the Dominican Sisters. The Dominican Retreat House was at the time of its closing in 2006 the oldest retreat house for women in the United States.

In February 2009, the Dominican Sisters sold the 42-acre property to the Land Conservancy of Elkins Park, PA, who intended to use the facility for group spiritual, health and wellness education retreats, and also as a venue for elegant special events. The property was reopened in September 2009 as Elkins Estate and has hosted a number of wedding receptions and events. But the conservancy could not keep up payments to the sisters who held the mortgage. In November 2010, because of numerous missed payments, including a $250,000 payment on the principal, the Dominican congregation foreclosed on the property, and the conservancy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. The property was in bankruptcy reorganization until October 2012, when the case was dismissed.

Another Hot One

Wow, temps in the 90’s today.  Almost too hot.  Here’s a few pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

It Really Felt Like Summer

Finally, it felt like summer today.  A welcome bit of heat after the long cold winter.

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Where the Germans Lived

Germantown is an area in Northwest Philadelphia. Founded by German Quaker and Mennonite families in 1683 as an independent borough, it was absorbed into Philadelphia in 1854.

The area, which is about six miles northwest from the city center, now consists of two neighborhoods: ‘Germantown’ and ‘East Germantown’

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

April Showers

May is almost upon us.  Time to bid April bye-bye with some pics…

Hover over any image for title and location where captured – click on any for a closer look.

All images shown were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Rain, Rain Go Away

Rain means busy for a rideshare driver.  Not much time for pics, but this one was worth the trouble.

Only One Way

“Only One Way” – Neighborhood: Kensington

This image was taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

More Street Scenes

Nice lighting out there today, got quite a few “keepers”.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Three Days New

Its been a while, but I have a good amount of pics to make up for the delay.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Philly Yo!

Great day in the greatest of cities – my home and heart reside in Philadelphia.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Spring Has Sprung

Temperatures in the high 60’s means lots of people out and about..  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Nice to be Back

Ahhh…  Managed to stay in the city confines for most of the day today.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

 

All of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens.  They were then processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Skimpy Day

I got yanked out of the city very early this morning and didn’t have much time after getting back, so these two images will have to do for today…

 

Barren

“Barren” – Neighborhood: Cobbs Creek

 

Botulism Waiting to Happen

“Botulism Waiting to Happen” – Neighborhood: University City

Both of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon 16-55 f/2.8 lens.  They were then processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Infamous Address – 6221 Osage Avenue

The location of the MOVE siege and subsequent bombing that burned down two city blocks of row homes.

MOVE House

“MOVE House” – Neighborhood: Cobbs Creek

MOVE is a Philadelphia-based black liberation group founded by John Africa (born Vincent Leaphart) in 1972.  The group is particularly known for two major conflicts with the Philadelphia Police Department.

Living communally in a house in West Philadelphia (Powelton Village initially), members of MOVE all changed their surnames to Africa, shunned modern technology and materialism, and preached support of animal rights, revolution and a return to nature.

Their first conflict with law enforcement occurred in 1978, when police tried to evict them from their house. A firefight erupted, killing one police officer and injuring several more on both sides.  After surrendering, Delbert Africa was subjected to one of the most horrific examples of police brutality ever witnessed.

Encouraged by the eminently racist Mayor of the City (Frank Rizzo), the police and investigators lied their asses off to justify their actions.

Nine members of the group were sentenced to 100 years in prison for the officer’s killing – even though evidence clearly pointed to “friendly fire” for this unfortunate action. In 1981, the group moved to a row house on Osage Avenue.

At their new home, MOVE members boarded up the windows and armed themselves in an attempt to protect their family from further police action.  Members continued to rack up violations from contempt of court to illegal possession of firearms, to the point where they were considered a terrorist organization by the mayor and police commissioner.

On the morning of May 13, 1985, the police moved on the house.

Arriving with arrest warrants for four residents of the house, the police ordered them to come out peacefully. Before long, shooting began – who started shooting first is a point of contention.

In response, more than 500 police officers discharged over 10,000 rounds of ammunition in 90 minutes. The house was hit with high-pressure firehoses and tear gas, but MOVE did not surrender.

Despite pleas for deescalation to the mayor from City Council President Joseph Coleman and State Senator Hardy Williams, Police Commissioner Gregore Sambor gave the order to bomb the house.

At 5:28 p.m., a satchel bomb composed of FBI-supplied C4 and Tovex TR2, a dynamite substitute, on a 45-second timer was dropped from a state police helicopter, detonating on the roof of the house.

Within minutes, a fire had consumed the roof and begun to spread.

Firefighters, already fearful of being shot at, were told to let the fire burn.

The blaze raged out of control, spreading down the block of row houses and hopping the narrow streets.

By the time it was extinguished four hours later, 61 houses had been razed. Apart from a woman and 13-year-old boy who escaped when the fire started, everyone in the MOVE house was dead.

The 11 deaths included MOVE founder John Africa, five adults and five children between the ages of seven and 13.

Despite investigations and formal apologies, neither the mayor, nor the police commissioner, nor anyone else from the city was criminally charged.

The image above shows this address as it appears now.  It was rebuilt (along with two whole adjoining blocks) in the years that followed the incident.  Oddly enough, all of these new structures were built very poorly by city-awarded contractors, and were all formally condemned afterwards.

The featured image in this post (historic street scene taken at the height of the uprising in 1985) is credited to Peter Morgan of the Associated Press.

Want to know more?  Have a look at this excellent film…

 

Nice Day on the Streets

Beautiful, albeit short, day today for shooting.  Spring may finally be upon us.

Here are the highlights…

Hover over any image in the mosaic above to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F, and processes with Iridient X-Transformer & Adobe Lightroom Classic.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

A Tale of Two Neighborhoods

We have a couple of “bonus” images for today, taken in two distinctly different neighborhoods.

Ogontz…

PeelingPart of my series &quot;Streets of Philadelphia&quot;.View the rest, here... <a href="//streetsofphilly.blog/&quot;">StreetOfPhilly.Blog</a>

“Peeling” – Long neglected storefront on 10th Street.

Ogontz gets its name from Ogontz Avenue, a thoroughfare which runs diagonally through the uniform grid of streets in the city.  Many of the commercial and residential properties on Ogontz Ave. began to decline in the early 1970s.

This North Philadelphia neighborhood has been marginalized throughout the years with many of the businesses closing and residents leaving.  Ogontz is often considered part of West Oak Lane, which is a much larger neighborhood and lot of what happens there carries over.

Ogontz is a predominantly middle-class African American community.  While some of the houses are the typical row homes found throughout Philadelphia, Ogontz has some architecture that is distinct to its neighborhood.  Many of the houses are detached on tree lined streets with small yards.  This set-up gives it a very suburban feel and makes it appealing to families with children.

The neighborhood used to have several historic sites such as the tavern, Cedar Park Inn and The Ogontz theatre.  Both of these locations were eventually closed down and demolished.

East Oak Lane…

Once GrandPart of my series &quot;Streets of Philadelphia&quot;.View the rest, here... <a href="//streetsofphilly.blog/&quot;">StreetOfPhilly.Blog</a>

“Once Grand” – Typical of many of the large but now decaying estate type homes in the area.

This area of Philadelphia was first settled in 1683 as one of  William Penn’s first neighborhoods.  In 1695, a Welshman named Griffith Miles bought 250 acres of land here and built a log home along a dirt road that would later be known as Oak Lane.  The area became known as Milestown in 1711, and as farming began to flourish, water-powered mills were built.

The road that came to define the neighborhood, initially called Martin’s Mill Road, was renamed Oak Lane by a landowner in 1860, in remembrance of an ancient oak tree that had blown down in a storm.

Once exclusive to the wealthy, who built a great many estate homes on it’s tree-lined streets, it is now an area where people of decidedly more modest means call home.

Both of these images were taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Only in Olney

Olney is an interesting neighborhood in Philadelphia. It is roughly bounded by Roosevelt Boulevard to the south, Tacony Creek to the east, Godfrey Avenue to the north, and the railroad right-of-way west of Seventh Street to the west.

Although Olney is primarily a quiet residential neighborhood, portions do serve as major commercial centers for many surrounding groups. 5th Street has a Korean-American business district in the vicinity of Olney Avenue, and Hispanic businesses flourish in the southern reaches of the neighborhood.

Beauty

“Beauty”

One of the many businesses that flourish along 5th Street.

Tired

“Tired”

I had been trying to get this shot for days, but the traffic behind me never would cooperate – until today.

De-Fence!

“De-Fence!”

Here is some more info on this particular area – courtesy of Wikipedia:

Up until the late nineteenth century, Olney was a vast, hilly farmland in the hinterland of Philadelphia County. Until then, the population consisted mainly of farmers and wealthy Philadelphians who could afford to live away from the city.

As the city of Philadelphia grew northwards, the area became more urbanized. People seeking to escape the growing population density towards the center moved to Olney. Soon thereafter, businesses began appearing, largely centered at 5th Street and Olney Avenue. Industry was also attracted and companies such as Heintz Manufacturing Company, Proctor and Schwartz, and Brown Instrument Division built factories in the neighborhood. But this took second place to the strong commercial district, led by the Olney Businessmans’ Association.

The population grew even more after the construction of the Broad Street Subway which had its original terminal at Olney Avenue (Olney Transportation Center). It promised to get riders from Olney to City Hall in less than twenty minutes for fifteen cents. In addition to trolley lines that traveled east and west, this made Olney Philadelphia’s northern transportation hub and gave Olneyites easy access to the entire city and beyond.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F and processed with Iridient X-Transformer and Adobe Lightroom.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Here, There and a Bit of Everywhere

Covered a decent amount of ground today.  Managed to visit more than a few neighborhoods in this fair city.

Here are the highlights…

Hover over any image in the mosaic above to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Strawberry / Nicetown Dreams

Very short day for me.  Only 2 images to post – a definite deficit – both in terms of “quantity” and “quality” this time around.

Oh well, there is always tomorrow…

Gritty

“Gritty” – Neighborhood: Strawberry Mansion

Still Available

“Still Available” – Neighborhood: Tioga / Nicetown

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Meandering in North Philly…

Just a few today.  Only managed to cover a couple of neighborhoods, mostly in North Philly.

Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All of today’s images taken with a FujiFilm X100F.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

A Friday full of Scenes…

Much more travel today, captured a good amount of images in some very interesting places today.

Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All images captured with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 lens.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Rider Story – Mariano

Meet Marino…

Mariano From Peru

Mariano From Peru

I picked up this young man in Ambler, just north of the city and he was very excited to be on his way to complete his lifeguarding test at the local YMCA.  It would be the culmination of a dream for him, as after he passed he would be guaranteed a job at this same “Y”.

17 year old Mariano and his mother came to the US from Lima, Peru about a year and a half ago, and while he misses his country of birth, he loves it here.  His english is great, spoken with a beautiful accent, but its amazing how well he converses.  He loves the music playing in my car (mostly 70’s soul), and tells me he remembers most of these songs from his uncle back home in Lima.

James Truslow Adams, in his book The Epic of America, stated that the American dream is “that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement.”

I’m very happy Mariano and his mother get to experience their American dream, this is exactly why this country has thrived.  The United States is a nation of immigrants; this country is made up of immigrants and descendants of immigrants, it is unfortunate that too many already settled here seem to easily forget that.

More Random Street Scenes…

Managed to visit a bunch of neighborhoods today, got some decent shots in along the way.  Here is a sampling of the days work.  Hover over any image in the mosaic below to display the tile and location where captured, click for a closer look and to leave comments.

All images captured with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 lens.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Wandering in Southwest Philly…

Ahhh… Good old Southwest Philly.  Some say that this is one of the more “dangerous” areas of the city – an opinion I do not share.  Maybe its because I grew up not too far from here in Upper Darby, or maybe I’m just stupid – you decide.

Although many people who live in the neighborhood are proud working class people, the area continues to be riddled with all sorts of mayhem. Violent crime is certainly not a rarity in the area, but I still say there are a lot worse places to live.

Here’s some more boring info courtesy of Wikipedia:

More than 80,000 people live in Southwest Philadelphia. It is approximately 60% black, 36% white, and 4% Asian.  Until the late 1960s, Southwest Philadelphia was considered an Irish-American neighborhood until Vietnamese refugees settled in the area along with African-Americans from nearby West Philadelphia. Philadelphia’s African immigrant population has been most concentrated in Southwest Philadelphia and Northeast Philadelphia starting from the beginning of the twenty-first century. The majority of the immigrants are mainly Liberian refugees of Gio, Mano, Mandinka, Bassa, Grebo, and Kru descent, along with immigrants from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Cote d’Ivoire. Southwest Philadelphia has long been called a haven for refugees.

A few decent shots from today. You can leave feedback below – which is always appreciated.

Small Yard, Many Bikes

Small Yard, Many Bikes

Stench!

STENCH!

Bedding

Bedding

God &amp; Beer

God & Beer

All images captured in Southwest Philadelphia with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 lens.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Busy Day on the Street…

Good shooting day, today.  Managed to get some decent shots along the way.  “Hover” over any of the thumbnails below for title and location info, click for full size and additional comments.

All images captured with a FujiFilm X-H1 and Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 lens.  I’m starting to REALLY like this new setup.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Just Another Day on the Streets…

First time out with some new equipment.  A couple of shots in the University City neighborhood, captured with a FujiFilm X-H1 and XF 16-55mm F/2.8 lens.

Halal

Halal

Only One Way

Only One Way

Hopefully Spring has actually arrived here in the city, and I hope to be shooting a LOT more soon.

If you are interested in ordering high-quality prints of any of these images, you may do so HERE.

Philly Nor’Easter

Digging Out in Torresdale

The aftermath of a freak mid March snowstorm in Philly.

Wow!  Just what everyone in the city just loves…  Snow, and lots of it, in March.

In what may be the most leonine start to March on record, two massive and powerful nor’easters have already roared through the region, leaving hundreds of thousands without power and well over a foot of snow in spots in just the first week of the month.

Infamous Address – 3514 North Marshall Street

Strange odors sometimes wafted from this dilapidated house in the Tioga section of North Philadelphia, smells that neighbors likened to burning flesh. Then there were the odd noises: hammering at all hours, and what sounded like an electric saw and other power tools. Heavy-metal music blared day and night. But no one suspected the horrors that Philadelphia police discovered back in 1987, when they raided the house owned by Gary Heidnik, 43, a self-anointed “bishop” of his own church who flashed rolls of money and drove expensive cars.

Parts of one woman’s body were found in the freezer, and pieces of bone were located elsewhere in the kitchen. In the dungeon-like basement, furnished only with a portable toilet and two mattresses, three half-naked women clung to life. Two of them were chained to sewer pipes; the third was imprisoned in a shallow open pit covered with plywood weighted down by bags of dirt. Said Chief Inspector James Gallagher of the Philadelphia police department: “It was ghastly.”

You can follow this LINK to Wikipedia to learn all about all the grisly details.

As of the date of this post, the building has been completely demolished.

Infamous Address – 3801 Lancaster Avenue

At the eastern edge of Philadelphia’s Powelton Village neighborhood, stands a boarded up –  triangular-shaped brick building that once was home to a clinic known as “The Women’s Medical Society”.

This practice was owned and operated by one Dr. Kermit Gosnell, a provider of late-term abortions and a prolific prescriber of OxyContin.

The circumstances surrounding this clinic, and the good doctor in particular, make for some very interesting (and quite horrifying) reading.

You can follow this LINK to Wikipedia to learn all about all the grisly details.

As of the date of this post, the building is unoccupied but still standing.

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